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Libertarian Party of Canada
Parti libertarien du Canada
Leader Tim Moen[1]
President Nichole Adams [2]
Founded 1973
Headquarters 372 Rideau St., Suite 205
Ottawa, Ontario[1][3]
Ideology Libertarianism
Classical liberalism
Voluntaryism
Non-interventionism
International affiliation International Alliance of Libertarian Parties
InterLibertarians
Colours Yellow / Indigo
Seats in the House of Commons Template:Infobox political party/seats
Seats in the Senate Template:Infobox political party/seats
Website
Template:Official website

The Libertarian Party of Canada is a political party in Canada, founded in 1973. The party subscribes to classical liberal tenets of the libertarian movement across Canada. The mission of the Libertarian Party of Canada is to reduce the responsibilities and expense of government. [4]Policies the party advocates for include: ending drug prohibition, lowering taxes, protecting gun rights and non-interventionism.[5]

2015 Platform[6]Edit

  • Reduce federal income taxes to a maximum rate of 15% and increase the personal income tax exemption amount to $17,300 from $11,500
  • Eliminate all tax credits, and replace them with 4 additional exemptions, valued at $4,000 each (Child, Senior, Disability, Student)
  • End all forms of corporate welfare
  • Audit the Bank of Canada’s effect on inflation and gradually phase out government control over the money supply
  • Enforce property rights so individuals have full ownership over their land and the natural resources above and below it
  • Encourage a system whereby harm and property damage as a result of pollution can be dealt with through the judicial system
  • Remove eminent domain legislation by repealing the Expropriation Act
  • Immediately withdraw Canadian armed forces from international conflicts.
  • Reallocate military resources for the purpose of national defence, and Arctic sovereignty.
  • Restructure the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development in the following way:
  1. Eliminate all forms of government foreign aid
  2. Encourage remittances.
  3. Unilaterally end all tariffs on foreign goods.
  • Immediately repeal Bill C-51
  • End Warrantless Searches
  • Replace the Indian Act with a blanket guarantee of sovereignty for all indigenous groups.
  • End all federal restrictions and obligations on indigenous territories
  • Streamline the Land Claim process
  • Repeal the powers of the CRTC over radio, television and communications
  • Eliminate the unfair price manipulation and quota system of the Dairy Board.
  • Reduce the CATSA and government fees for passengers coming from abroad to encourage more tourism and enterprise
  • Repeal section 91 and 92 of the Criminal Code to make responsible gun possession legal
  • Revise the legal definition of weapon and firearm to reflect that guns are tools when in the hands of qualified civilians
  • The federal government should leave the entirety of health care decisions to provincial and territorial governments.

HistoryEdit

The party was founded on July 7, 1973 by Bruce EvoyTemplate:Citation needed, who became its first chairman, and seven others. Evoy ran for election to Parliament in the 1974 federal election in the Toronto riding of Rosedale. The party achieved registered status in the 1979 federal election by running more than fifty candidates.

The party described itself as Canada's "fourth party" in the 1980s Template:Citation needed, but it has since been displaced by new parties such as the Bloc Québécois and the Green Party of Canada. The party declined to join the Reform Party of Canada when it was formed in 1987 Template:Citation needed. Many libertarians were also attracted to provincial Progressive Conservative parties that moved to the right during the 1990s in Ontario under Mike Harris, and in Alberta under Ralph Klein.

The decline in the party's membership and resources resulted in Elections Canada removing their status as a registered party immediately before the 1997 federal election when the party failed to run the minimum fifty candidates needed to maintain its registration. Template:Citation needed

Jean-Serge Brisson led the party from May 22, 2000 until May 18, 2008 when he was succeeded by Dennis Young. Young defeated outgoing party president Alan Mercer for the leadership. Savannah Linklater was elected deputy leader.[7]

In May 2011, Katrina Chowne was elected leader of the Libertarian Party.

In May 2014, Tim Moen was elected leader of the Libertarian Party.

In the 2015 federal election, the party fielded 72 candidates and solidified their position as the 6th federal party in Canada. With growth over 500% from the 2011 elections, the party is the fastest growing party.

Election resultsEdit

Election # of candidates # of votes % of popular vote % in ridings contested
1979 60 16,042 0.134% 0.576%
1980 58 14,656 0.134% 0.576%
1984 72 23,514 0.187% 0.705%
1988 88 33,185 0.252% 0.754%
1993 52 14,630 0.118% 0.580%
1997 * * *
2000 * * *
2004 8 1,949 0.015% 0.518%
2006 10 3,002 0.02% 0.57%
2008 26 7,300 0.053% 0.567%
2011 23 6,017 0.04% 0.498%
2015 72[8] 37,407[9][10] 0.21% 0.93%

The party also nominated a number of candidates to run in by-elections:

  • 1980 by-election: 1
  • 1981 by-election: 1
  • 1982 by-election: 1
  • 1990 by-election: 2
  • 1995 by-election: 1
  • 2008 by-election: 1
  • 2010 by-election: 1
  • 2012 by-election: 3
  • 2013 by-election: 3
  • 2014 by-election: 2

Sources: 1974: Libertarian Party of Canada News, July/August 1974, 4. 1979-2006: Parliament of Canada History of the Federal Electoral Ridings since 1867

LeadersEdit

File:George Dance 1988.jpg
  • Sieg Pedde (1973–1974)
  • Charles 'Chuck' Lyall (1974–1976)
  • Ron Bailey (1976–1978)
  • Alex Eaglesham (1978–1979)
  • Linda Cain (1980–1982)
  • Neil Reynolds (May 1982 – 1983)
  • Victor Levis (1983–1987)
  • Dennis Corrigan (1987–1990)
  • Stanisław Tymiński (1990–1991)
  • George Dance (1991–1993)
  • Hilliard Cox (May 1993 – 1995)
  • George Dance (1995–1996)
  • Vincent Pouliot (May 12, 1996 – April 5, 1997)
  • Robert Morse (1997–1999) [11]
  • Jean-Serge Brisson (1999 – May 18, 2008) Template:Ref[12]
  • Dennis Young (May 18, 2008 – May 2011)
  • Katrina Chowne (May 2011 – May 2014)
  • Tim Moen (May 2014 – present)

See alsoEdit

Template:Portal

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

Archival holdingsEdit

External linksEdit

Template:Canadian federal political parties